Monthly archives: July, 2014

Faculty Highlights – Spring 2014

From the desk of… Mark Byrne, Daniel F. and Josephine Breeden associate professor of chemical engineering, has been awarded a $400,000 grant from the National Institute of Health to study and develop extended-wear contact lenses that treat glaucoma by slowly releasing a controlled dose of medication to the eye over an extended period of time….




Into the Lab: Aerospace Engineering

Joseph Majdalani, Auburn Alumni Engineering Council endowed professor and chair of aerospace engineering, and Joshua Batterson, assistant professor of aerospace engineering, are studying the oscillatory behavior and vibratory response, known as combustion instability, of chemical rockets, gas turbines and large combustors. These researchers are investigating the behavior of resonant combustion modes and acoustic instabilities which…




Into the Lab: Chemical Engineering

It is said one hour of sunlight hitting the Earth can run the operations of mankind for one year, and Bruce Tatarchuk, Charles E. Gavin professor of chemical engineering and director of the Center for Microfibrous Materials Manufacturing, is ready to help harness that energy. Tatarchuk received an X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) instrument from the…




Into the Lab: Polymer and Fiber Engineering

Xinyu Zhang, associate professor in polymer and fiber engineering, received a $350,000 award from Leading Edge Aeronautics Research for NASA Fund to study technology that would improve composite material in aerospace structures. This is phase two of Zhang’s ongoing research titled: “Poptube Technology, Enabling Multifunctional Hybrid Composites for Next Generation Aircrafts.” Phase one of research…




Small-scale science = big impact

The 2014 NanoDays kicked off in March with future engineers and scientists descending on the Agricultural Heritage Park Pavilion on Auburn’s campus. More than 60 students, grades 2-10, jumped into hands-on experiments and eagerly learned scientific concepts at the nanoscale level. From measuring themselves in nanometers to being trapped in a large nanotube, students explored…




Hip hip hooray for engineers!

Feb. 16-22 marked National Engineers Week, and the College of Engineering celebrated using social media. We asked our alumni, using the college’s Facebook page, why they are proud to be an Auburn engineer. As expected, we received a great response! Participants consistently mentioned Auburn Engineering’s fundamental engineering education and the spirit of the Auburn family….




Recognizing a good thing

The Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering recently achieved a milestone – receiving accreditation status from the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society (HFES) for its Occupational Safety and Ergonomics and Occupational Injury Prevention programs. This is the first year the program has achieved this level of accreditation according to Sean Gallagher, associate professor in the…




E-Day

E-Day, Auburn Engineering’s annual student recruitment open house held in February, saw its largest turnout to date with more than 3,000 students, parents and teachers gathering on campus to learn about the College of Engineering. The event offered middle and high school students the opportunity to tour engineering facilities, as well as the Auburn campus….


Tags:


Mighty fine fellows

Chris Bartel, Jacob Clary and Alex Roman, seniors in chemical engineering, as well as Zack Coker, a 2013 graduate in software engineering, have been named 2014 graduate research fellows by the National Science Foundation. Alex Wolff, a senior in aerospace engineering, received an honorable mention. The students, who were recognized for their demonstrated potential to…




ErgoDivas

The ErgoDivas, Auburn University’s ergonomics team, took top honors among 36 teams from across the U.S. and the world to win the 7th Annual Ergonomics Design Competition. The competition consisted of teams assessing ergonomic hazards in assigned work tasks and identifying solutions to those hazards. The event was divided into three areas: a preliminary problem,…