Monthly archives: October, 2011

Since 9/11

The world can be a dangerous place. And anyone who doubts that we could be safer or more secure in it — in our homes, schools, offices and in our skies — should simply look to the headlines. In September, the U.S. solemnly remembered the tenth anniversary of our country’s worst homeland attack since the…



So long, farewell: Saying goodbye to the space shuttle

This article includes a number of stories, notes and accounts retold by alumni and friends of the college, as well as highlights from a history of Auburn aerospace engineering compiled by department head John Cochran. NASA’s first space shuttle mission lifted off from Kennedy Space Center on April 12, 1981, when the orbiter Columbia, carrying…



Roots run deep

The poisoning of Toomer’s Oaks hits most of us deeper than one story can tell. Much of the media coverage surrounding the controversial act speaks highly of Auburn’s rich history, but a recent article for ESPN: The Magazine honored Auburn’s legacy on a deeper level. The story featured Auburn Engineering alum Maury Gaston, an ‘82…



A Centennial of Auburn Engineering: Modern Leadership for the Modern Age of Engineering

This article has been adapted from chapters of a manuscript by alum Art Slotkin, ’68 aerospace, detailing the history of Auburn Engineering, from its founding in 1869 to its establishment as a college in 1908 and into the modern age of engineering that we know today. In the decades that built up to the turn…



Travis Taylor: Rocket City Redneck

Years before he was performing homemade experiments using beer cans and plywood for National Geographic Channel’s new show, “Rocket City Rednecks,” Travis Taylor was attending classes in Parker and Broun Hall, building the foundation in engineering that would lead him to a career with the Army, Department of Defense and NASA in his hometown of…



Cutting-edge

Auburn’s autonomous lawnmower team placed second in the Institute of Navigation (ION) robotic lawnmower competition this summer in Beavercreek, Ohio. The team earned a $10,000 prize for the dynamic event by navigating its robot, Moe, through a playing field while cutting grass and avoiding obstacles. Areas of the field were assigned different points, with sections of…



Paper out, iPad in

Out with the notebook paper, in with the iPad. Computer science and software engineering doctoral candidates Jonathan Lartigue and Russell Thackston have developed an interactive iPad application that teaches elementary school students about nutrition. The application, Body Quest: Food of the Warrior, features six animated characters that provide nutrition facts and lessons through a series…



What’s New: As Paul Harvey used to say, we’re moving “the rest of the story.”

You already know that the College of Engineering has a new and improved online edition of the alumni magazine you know and love. But there’s more… Want to keep track of the college’s news as it happens? Our newly designed college newsroom features stories and highlights from our faculty and students. Visit eng.auburn.edu/news Don’t forget to…



Development update

Uncompromising Excellence Auburn Engineering prides itself on a commitment to recruiting and maintaining the nation’s top faculty members. With that commitment comes an effort to recognize the exceptional merit of faculty members who have demonstrated achievement in educating tomorrow’s engineers and conducting leading research. As part of a university-wide initiative to create additional endowments for…



Faculty Highlights – Fall/Winter 2012

FEATURED HIGHLIGHT Mario Eden, Joe T. and Billie Carole McMillan associate professor in chemical engineering, has been awarded a $3 million, five-year grant from the National Science Foundation to instruct more than 30 doctoral students in sustainable biofuels and chemicals. The grant, a collaborative Integrative Graduate Education and Research Traineeship, is Auburn’s first. It will…